Fat Cells

How is fat used in Regenerative Medicine?

Fat is a versatile tissue that plays essential role in the way the body functions. Fat also plays a remarkable role in how the body heals. A variety of studies over many decades have been conducted exploring the healing potential of fat. Fat has long been used for support of tissue repair and replacement. Fat has the ability to be a source of important cells which produce important proteins involved with healing and reduction in inflammation.

Benefits of Using Fat

FAT is the highest quality tissue

Adipose tissue contains a high concentration of important reparative cells that may help support the healing process.

FAT provides cushion & support

Adipose tissue is a structural tissue and provides cushion and support to help the healing process.

FAT doesn’t decline with age

Research has shown that as a person ages, their FAT maintains its reparative properties unlike other similar tissue, which may lose healing capacity with age. 2,3,4

CDA-Regenerative-Medicine-Fat-Cells-Lipogems-Orthopedics-Spine

Advantages Of Using Fat

  • Fat is minimally invasive to harvest
  • Most people have extra fat
  • Fat is the highest quality tissue
  • Fat has 100-500 times more reparative cells than other similar tissue.1
  • Research has shown that as a person ages, their fat maintains its reparative properties unlike other similar tissue, such as bone marrow, which may lose healing capacity with age. 2,3,4
  • Fat contains many supportive and reparative cells that help to promote a healing environment throughout the body.
References
  1. Caplan A: 2013: Mesenchymal stem cells environmentally responsive therapeutics for regenerative medicine.Experimental & Molecular medicine. 45(11):e54.
  2. Beane, Olivia S., et al. “Impact of aging on the regenerative properties of bone marrow-, muscle-, and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.” PloS one 9.12 (2014): e115963.
  3. Stolzing, Alexandra, et al. “Age-related changes in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells: consequences for cell therapies.” Mechanisms of ageing and development 129.3 (2008): 163-173.
  4. Kern, Susanne, et al. “Comparative analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, or adipose tissue.” Stem cells 24.5 (2006): 1294-1301